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Pueblo Indian Pottery ~ Native American Wedding Vases

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Acoma • Hopi-Tewa • Jemez • Santa Clara/San Ildefonso
Laguna • Zia • ZuniSanto Domingo • Micaceous • Wedding Vases
  Other Tribes  •  StorytellersFetishes, Sculptures, Kachinas
Native American Paintings & Sculpture   •  Southwest Decor Slip Cast Pottery

Ask a Question: Send an E-mail to Us Now  •  How To Purchase

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Pueblo Pottery Maine Gallery 2007

Pueblo Pottery Maine
Our gallery is located in Limington, Maine, USA (25 miles West of Portland off Route 25) and can be visited by appointment at your convenience.
Directions in Maine

Please send your e-mail to : pluise@fairpoint.net for more information or call Paul at 207-637-2547. Send mail to P.O. Box 45, Limington, ME 04049.

Credit Card Online Payments
 

We accept Visa, Mastercard, and Discover, bank, postal and personal checks. Shipping, handling, and insurance are included in the prices. When an order is placed, a Certificate of Authenticity stating the specific cost is created and sent to you along with a potter's biography if one is available. We ship via United Parcel Service.

American Express not accepted due to
unreasonably high fee charged to merchants.

How to make a Purchase

Ownership of these beautiful pots is meant to make people feel good so your satisfaction is part of our intention in selling these one-of-a-kind works of art --- in short, satisfaction guaranteed. We provide Certificates of Authenticity and stand behind our product and our services - 100%. We want you to be happy with your purchase and with our service. Pueblo Pottery in Maine has met the strict standards of the Indian Arts & Crafts Association (IACA) and achieved the Association's certification as an ethical business supporting the promotion and protection of authentic Native American art and culture. Customer feedback.....

Mother Earth & the Human Spirit made One!


logoMember of the Indian Arts and Crafts Association (IACA) in support of the ethical promotion and protection of authentic Native American art and culture. IACA works to stop fraud and abuse within the market for Indian art through education, publicity, authentication and use of its logo to indicate certified ethical businesses.

My attraction to the Southwest began as a boy with my family's subscription to Arizona Highways. It wasn't until the early 1970s that I made my first trip to the Southwest as an artist in the medium of photography to participate in a photography workshop. It was held in Tucson where I was privileged to study under Ansel Adams, Minor White, Judy Dater, Jack Welpott, Frederick Summers and several other well-known photographers. I saw how different the colors, terrain and the light of the Southwest were from my home in New England. (Photo: Paul Luise and Noel Laate, Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico, 2012)

I saw pueblo pottery several times prior to becoming interested in it. I thought it was nice but I never purchased. Then, on a visit to Chimayo, New Mexico, I met Joseph Sisneros, director of the Rancho de Chimayo Collection, who generously spent hours explaining the devotion, the artistry, the endurance, and the spirit of the pueblo potters who produce this beautiful art work. As an artist, as a patron of the arts, and as a person who loves and respects Nature, I could not help but be captivated.

Today, when I hold a piece of pueblo pottery in my home, I can smell pinion and cedar smoldering; see a seemingly endless horizon filled with turquoise skies and muted pastel colored hills; mesas and canyons; and the crisp, dry morning air warming as the sun begins to cast its light on the earth after a cool dessert night. Holding this pottery reconnects us with Mother Earth and the natural order. The stress and fear inherent to the world of men and women in the 21st century seem to fade into the background. It's a bit of magic and this pottery is the medium through which Mother Earth and the human spirit become one.

Pueblo pottery is created by people who stand closer to the Earth and the natural way than most of us ever will. They have done so for countless generations as once, long ago, all our ancestors did. It is the difference between 'taking' and 'receiving' that distinguishes them from our society's usual approach to the Earth and her bounty. That difference blesses them with an incredible ability to discover such beauty in the most base element of creation--- clay. Through this pottery we can share that blessing and hopefully a better vision of the place we call home and our connection to it. This belief is why I've chosen to present and promote these wonderful creations. Most all those from whom I purchase and those to whom I sell have found a spiritual link to life, Mother Earth and the Creator through this pottery. I honor that connection by conducting my gallery business with honesty, integrity and fairness. I give my word and I keep it. ~ P.L.

 

Pueblo Pottery Maine Newsletter

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Futures for Children American Indian Store

Kendra's Graduation 2008Futures for Children is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of education for Native American Children through mentoring and training. Through its three Circles of Support, Futures for Children encourages success and leadership in communities.

Friendship/Mentorship provides Native American children with much needed one-to-one Janet, Kendra and Paulencouragement to stay in school and succeed academically. Through letters, E-mail, phone calls and visits from mentors, students are encouraged to complete high school and pursue post-secondary education. To learn more about becoming a mentor, click here.

Working with parents, families and communities Families in Action strengthens Native children's primary support systems and increases the involvement of parents and families in their children's academic pursuits. The support of family and community positively impacts their life choices and success.


In the 1990s, I was honored and blessed to meet and learn from these Native American teachers who helped me find a good path. Ed McGaa and the late Wallace Black Elk both have published books.
Vince & Mom Stogan
Copyright Paul Luise
Wallace Black Elk
Copyright Paul Luise

Grandfather,
Look at our brokeness.

We know that in all creation
Only the human family
Has strayed from the Sacred Way.

We know that we are the ones
Who are divided
And we must come back togethr
To walk in the Sacred Way.

Grandfather, Sacred One,
Teach us love, compassion, and honor
That we may heal the earth
And heal each other.

Ojibway prayer

Petition to revoke the 20 Medals of Honor
awarded to soldiers for the massacre of 328 Native American men, women & children at Wounded Knee, December 29, 1890.


Photography by Paul J. Luise

Copyrights 1974-2015

copyright Paul Luise

copyright Paul Luise

copyright Paul Luise
copyright Paul Luise
copyright Paul Luise copyright Paul Luise
copyright Paul Luise copyright Paul Luise

Smile God Loves You

Acoma • Hopi-Tewa • Jemez • Santa Clara/San Ildefonso
Laguna • Zia • ZuniSanto Domingo • Micaceous • Wedding Vases
  Other Tribes  •  StorytellersFetishes, Sculptures, Kachinas
Native American Paintings & Sculpture   •  Southwest Decor Slip Cast Pottery

Ask a Question: Send an E-mail to Us Now  •  How To Purchase

Homepage  •  Welcome  •  The Pueblos   •  Learn More •  Contact Us  
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© 2000, 2015 The contents of this web site, all photography, graphics and text are copyright to Paul Luise as is the name Pueblo Pottery In Maine, Pueblo Pottery Maine, Mother Earth & The Human Spirit Made One.